ArcticDx Unveils Pharmacogenetic Testing for Ocular Vitamin Therapy at ASRS

TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ArcticDx, Inc. announced that its Vita RiskTM pharmacogenetic analysis, which supports the genotype-directed selection of appropriate eye vitamin therapies for patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), will be available as part of the new Macula Risk® PGx test launched at the ASRS meeting. The Vita RiskTM analysis leverages the latest evidence-based medicine to provide a recommendation of zinc alone, antioxidants plus zinc, or antioxidants alone to tested patients based on the treatment that demonstrated the greatest benefit (reduction in the incidence of advanced AMD at 12 years) in an analysis of 995 patients from the AREDS dataset with moderate AMD in at least one eye.

This data demonstrates that the composition of supplements recommended to AMD patients should be guided by an individual’s genetic risk profile, indicating a clear role for genetic testing in clinical management.”

The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) demonstrated that high-dose supplementation with antioxidants plus zinc decreased the risk of progression to advanced AMD in patients with moderate to severe disease in one eye. A recently unveiled pharmacogenetic analysis of this dataset, titled “CFH and ARMS2 genetic polymorphisms predict response to antioxidants and zinc in patients with age-related macular degeneration“ (Ophthalmology 2013, in press), showed that components within the AREDS formulation may be beneficial or deleterious based on a patient’s genetic profile, and that 49% of the patients studied would have derived more benefit from a treatment regimen other than the AREDS formulation. Authors of the study also estimated that genotype-directed therapy of the AREDS study population would have more than doubled the reduction in AMD progression rate compared with treatment with the AREDS formulation.

“Genotype-directed nutritional therapy could result in significantly improved outcomes for many patients with moderate AMD,” suggests “CFH and ARMS2” first author Carl C. Awh, MD, of Tennessee Retina. Additionally, co-author Ivana K. Kim, MD, of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, notes that “This data demonstrates that the composition of supplements recommended to AMD patients should be guided by an individual’s genetic risk profile, indicating a clear role for genetic testing in clinical management.”

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